New Photos June 2013

IMG_2013

Geraldi dwarf mulberry setting tons of fruit.

IMG_2008

Forest garden understory filling in shady niches with useful species.

IMG_2019

Insectary polyculture – nectary and edible earth chestnut (Bunium bulbocastanum) with nectary green and gold (Chrysogonum virginianum) groundcover. Also lovely!

IMG_2022

Perennial wild bean climbs native false indigo living trellis.

IMG_2026

Giant Solomon’s seal with edible hostas and currants.

IMG_2029

The “outdoor room”. Everything you see edible or otherwise functional.

IMG_2034

Third try for living trellis for yamberry. This time mimosa after failure with red alder and Siberian pea.

IMG_2048

Hog peanut.

IMG_1985 IMG_1991 IMG_2032 IMG_2037

Advertisements

Horticulture Magazine Paradise Lot

Such a fantastic year for Jonathan and Eric, the Paradise Lot book and the Bioshelter. We seem to be getting a lot of press! I guess we caught the wave at the right time… or did we create the wave Read the Horticulture Magazine article, “Double-Duty Design: Permaculture puts plants to work for the benefit of the whole garden“

Excerpt from the book up at Scribd!

Now you can read the first ten pages of Paradise Lot: “Germination” at Scribd.

“Few gardeners would have looked out at the small, flat expanse of compacted land and thought, “It’s perfect!” The front yard was a short, steep slope of asphalt with a tiny strip of sterile gravel and sand subsoil. Two shady side alleys led to a backyard that looked like a moonscape, sparsely populated with tufts of crabgrass. Two large Norway maples, reviled as weeds that poison anything growing beneath them, hung over the garden from the north side. And the house itself was soulless, all straight lines, devoid of personality. It was exactly what we were hoping for…”

backyard before overview before front yard before